Angus Martin

Artist Photo

Angus Martin

“That’s one big thing that has always struck me about Angus’s music: Everyone who hears it just can’t resist it,” says Soluna producer and engineer Kale Kaposhilin. “It doesn’t matter if it’s a college kid or a grandparent, right away they just love it. Even Zac Shaw [drummer of infamous Kingston sludge-punk duo Dead Unicorn] is a huge fan.” And the fact that Martin sings in several languages—and rarely in English—sure doesn’t seem to be off-putting to the shuffling student bodies in Tivoli tonight, either. Le Demimonde features lyrics in Spanish and Haitian Creole, as well as English and French. “Actually, French is my first language,” says Martin, 38, who grew up in Marin County, California. “My mom is French and my dad is American, and we just always spoke French at home.” His jazz-loving father and classical pianist mother also introduced him to music, and at a young age he began studying blues and jazz piano, learning the rudiments of pop songwriting from Beatles and Bob Dylan records. After attending an experimental “hippie” high school and spending a few years as a landscaper in New Mexico, Martin enrolled at Bard “to get as far away from the West Coast as possible,” he recounts with a laugh. At around the time he came east, however, Martin experienced another turning point. On a whim he bought a used copy of the self-titled 1973 LP by Brazilian bossa nova god Joao Gilberto, and from there the sultry sounds of Latin music came flooding in. “That record just opened up a whole new world to me,” he recalls of the legendarily influential album, which features the sparse, hypnotic sound of only Gilberto’s voice and acoustic guitar and Sonny Carr’s minimal percussion. “I’d had no idea such deep beauty existed. It was like how hearing something like Bach or the Clash for the first time must be for others.” WACBIZ is proud to resent these fine works, thanks to Kale at Evolving Media.